Met to re-examine if Caroline Flack was treated differently

Met Police is told to re-examine if Caroline Flack was treated differently because of her fame – as Love Island star’s mother says she is still ‘sad and very angry’ at force

  • The Met Police will re-examine why Caroline Flack was charged not cautioned 
  • Her mother is demanding answers and says she was treated differently by cops 
  • The IOPC has asked the Met to re-investigate if her celebrity status was factor 

Caroline Flack’s mother has demanded an explanation over why the star was charged with assaulting her boyfriend – with the Met Police told to re-examine whether she was treated differently because of her fame. 

Flack, 40, killed herself at her London home on February 15, 2020 just one day after she found out the Crown Prosecution Service was pursuing a court case against her.  

Now, her mother Christine Flack has revealed she remains ‘sad and very angry’ at the way police treated her daughter in the weeks leading up to her death. 

She believes that Flack was treated differently because of her celebrity status and questioned why she was charged by the Met instead of cautioned, which the CPS had initially recommended. 

The IOPC agreed that her complaint was not fully addressed and has now instructed the Met Police to reinvestigate if she was treated differently because of who she was. 

Christine Flack has revealed she remains ‘ sad and very angry’ at the way police treated her daughter in the weeks leading up to her death

She believes that Flack was treated differently because of her celebrity status and questioned why she was charged by the Met instead of cautioned

Her mother told the BBC: ‘I just want those answers to make me feel better and to make me know that I’ve done the right thing by Caroline.’ 

Christine first complained to the Met a month after her daughter’s death and asked the force to investigate the procedures it followed when it arrested and charged her.

She said she was concerned about how the Met appealed against the CPS advice to give her a caution. 

The IOPC investigated and has found that one element of the complaint was not ‘fully addressed’ by the Met. 

It has directed the force to reinvestigate whether Flack would have been treated differently had she not been famous.

Christine said: ‘It leaves us really sad and really angry because we want to know why they charged her. I just want the truth out there. I know it won’t bring her back but I’ve got to do it for her.’ 

A spokesperson for the Met Police said: ‘The investigation by the MPS Directorate of Professional Standards into the complaints made by a close relative of Caroline Flack was completed in March 2021.

‘Following a full and transparent examination of all the facts, DPS found that the service was acceptable and no misconduct was identified for any officer. This report was shared with the complainant, who requested a review of the findings by the IOPC.

‘Following a review, the IOPC agreed with the MPS that service was acceptable in relation to seven areas of the complaints relating to the response and handling of the incident by the MPS.

The IOPC has directed the Met to reinvestigate whether Flack would have been treated differently had she not been famous

‘The IOPC has directed the MPS to reinvestigate one element of the complaints, this relates to the process involved in appealing the CPS decision to caution Ms Flack. We will re-examine this element of the investigative process.

‘Our thoughts and sympathies remain with Caroline’s family at this very difficult time.’

The IOPC has been contacted for comment. 

In the days after her death Flack’s management team described her as ‘vulnerable’ and criticised the CPS for pushing ahead with the case despite her boyfriend Lewis Burton saying he did not want to press charges. 

He had said she hit him with a lamp at her former home in Islington in December and as part of her bail conditions the pair were banned from contacting each other. 

But he later spoke out in defence of Flack, saying she has become the subject of a ‘witch hunt’ following her arrest. 

A member of Flack’s management team said the CPS should ‘look at themselves’ and how they pursued a trial ‘without merit’ which resulted in ‘significant distress to Caroline’.

The saga surrounding her court case saw her ‘step down’ from hosting Love Island.  

Friends of the presenter, who was paid a £1.2million salary for Love Island, said she had been terrified of her impending court date. ‘She was on her own. She couldn’t take it anymore. Her family are devastated,’ one friend told The Mirror.

Another added: ‘Caroline couldn’t bear the thought of going through the court case. She felt her career would never recover from this – and she felt humiliated in front of the world. In the end she just couldn’t see a way out. She didn’t know how to fix herself.’

Flack’s friends were said to be furious that the CPS pursued the presenter’s prosecution despite Burton making it clear he did not want the case to go to trial as there had been no serious injury.

Her management criticised the CPS in a statement. Francis Ridley, of Money Talent Management, said: ‘We are devastated at the loss of our client and friend Caroline Flack.

‘The Crown Prosecution Service pursued this when they knew not only how very vulnerable Caroline was but also that the alleged victim did not support the prosecution and had disputed the CPS version of events.

‘The CPS should look at themselves today and how they pursued a show trial that was not only without merit but not in the public interest. And ultimately resulted in significant distress to Caroline. Our thoughts are with Caroline’s family at this time.

‘An immensely talented young woman who was at the top of her game professionally and loved by television viewers across the country. In recent months Caroline had been under huge pressure because of an ongoing case and potential trial which has been well reported.’ 

For confidential support call the Samaritans on 116123 or visit a local Samaritans branch, see www.samaritans.org for details. 

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