Listen to a sailor tearfully recall losing a shipmate in the deadly terror attack on his ship USS Cole

  • This Monday marks the 20th anniversary of the terrorist attack on the US Navy destroyer USS Cole that killed 17 sailors and injured 39 others.
  • In remembrance of that tragedy, the US Navy released a video of two retired sailors and a Gold Star mother recalling the events of that day.
  • In one heartbreaking scene, retired Master Chief Paul Abney recalls through tears losing a shipmate.
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The US Navy released a powerful video Monday of retired sailors and a Gold Star mother recounting the deadly bombing of the destroyer USS Cole twenty years ago today.

In one heartbreaking scene, retired Master Chief Paul Abney breaks into tears as he remembers the loss of fellow sailor Operation Specialist 2nd Class Timothy Saunders. Abney said he stood watch with Saunders every day.

"Both of his legs were busted up so bad," he recalled. "They were out of shape, they were all twisted on the Stokes stretcher they were carrying him on."

Tears fill his eyes as he continues. "Still the same cheery personality, he gives me two thumbs up and says, 'They're taking care of me, master chief,' as they were carrying him off on a Stoke stretcher."

"He was the only shipmate who made it off and to the hospital that passed away over there," he said. "Every other one that we got off the ship and triaged to get off soon enough they made it. The rest of them died before we ever got them off the ship."

USS Cole was attacked by suicide bombers in a boat packed with explosives while in port in Yemen on October 12, 2000. The explosion tore a hole in the ship so large the crew spent several days containing the flooding that endangered the ship. "We almost lost her," retired Command Master Chief James Parlier said in the video.

"The pressure of it knocked me back in my chair," Abney said. "Along with it, all the lights went out. The next thing that I can really recall from the blast was this putrid, kind of acrid smoke. It was kind of hard to breathe. Everybody was choking from the smoke."

Seventeen sailors were killed, and another 39 others were injured in the attack.

Among the deceased was James McDaniels. His mother, Dianne McDaniels, learned about the attack on the news. That evening, she was informed that her son was gone. "I'm glad he did what he did as far as serving because that's what he wanted to do," she said.

"These were young men and women that you knew personally. We had a crew of 275," Parlier said. "Respectfully, to put them in a body bag is the worst thing I can ever think of."

The attack was attributed to al Qaeda, which carried out attacks in the US a little over a year later on September 11, 2001.

It took a little over a year to repair USS Cole and return her to sea. Parlier said that when the ship was finally fixed and sailing again, he felt pride "because we told them son of a b——s that we were not defeated and that we were coming back."

https://www.youtube.com/embed/ymlpHBIqLcg?start=291

In January of last year, the US military killed Jamel Ahmed Mohammed Ali Al-Badawi, an al Qaeda operative believed to have helped orchestrate the bombing of USS Cole, in an airstrike in Yemen.

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