Austin business 'The Russian House' shortens name in solidarity with Ukraine

FOX Business Flash top headlines for February 26

Here are your FOX Business headlines. 

A restaurant in Austin, Texas, that has represented Slavic and Eastern European culture for more than a decade, shortened its name Sunday afternoon over the Russian invasion of neighboring Ukraine. 

Varda Monamour, owner of "The Russian House" said she decided to remove "Russian" from the establishment's name to show solidarity with Ukraine. 

"It's okay to speak up and say that what's going on right now is wrong and needs to be stopped," Monamour told FOX 7 Austin. "To me, the name doesn't reflect what we really are. If it brings pain to others, we just feel like it needs to be just ‘The House.’"

US TECH COMPANY IN UKRAINE: EMPLOYEES VOLUNTEER TO FIGHT RUSSIA

‘The Russian House’ in Austin, Texas, shortened its name to ‘The House’ on Sunday over the Russian invasion of Ukraine (Google Maps)

The restaurant has represented both eastern European and Slavic dishes and has served as a vessel to carry these cultures and experiences to its customers over the years. 

Monamour, who has a mixture of eastern European heritage, including Ukrainian, hoped the name change would show that the business represents the food and culture of Russian, Slavic, and all post-soviet states, including Ukraine. 

"I'm doing this for the people of Ukraine because for them right now, the name is painful," Monamour told FOX 7. "I'm doing this for the people of Russia because there are so many people who don't want this. I'm doing this for the people of Austin because they need to know our position and understand what we really are."

Serghei, 30, a server at the restaurant said it was renamed to be welcoming for everyone because the establishment doesn't just represent Russian culture and cuisine.

"I feel that’s for good, honestly," Serghei told Fox News via phone. "It wasn’t fair that this place was called ‘Russian house.'"

UKRAINE FM SLAMS ‘TRAITORS TO HUMANITY’ FOR LEAVING RUSSIA SWIFT LOOPHOLES: ‘MONEY SOAKED IN OUR BLOOD’

A Polish border guard assists refugees from Ukraine as they arrive to Poland at the Korczowa border crossing, Poland, Saturday, Feb. 26, 2022. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski / AP Newsroom)

Monamour said the decision was also inspired by her children's futures and her pride in Russian heritage. 

Decorating the walls of her restaurant are notorious figures, things, and cultural contributions that have paved the historical legacy of the Russian people, Austin's KXAN-TV reported.

"There’s so many things to be proud of and we are," Monamour said, according to the station. "This is not because I’m banning my heritage. This is because — I’m doing this because I deeply love my culture and what I am, but today, it’s OK to speak up and say what is going on today is wrong, and it needs to be stopped."

The last letter was removed from the building Sunday, though Monamour admitted it felt bittersweet. 

"I’m going to hold onto [the letters]. It's going to get to a point where we are back and not ashamed," the owner said.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE ON FOX BUSINESS

Meanwhile, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott tweeted Saturday that he asked members of the Texas Restaurant Association, Texas Package Stores Association, and all Texas retailers to "voluntarily remove all Russian products from their shelves."

Source: Read Full Article