Brexit Britain warned it will not get a US trade deal until 2022

Brexit Britain is warned it will not get a US trade deal until ‘at least 2022’ because Democrat president-elect Joe Biden plans to rebuild ties with the EU

  • Brexit departure from the EU has left the UK less important to Washington 
  • Former diplomats also suggested attempts to woo Donald Trump damaged ties
  • Democrat Biden due to enter the White House as president on January 20 

Brexit Britain was warned today not to expect a trade deal with the United States to be  agreed until 2022 as the Joe Biden administration attempts to woo the European Union.

The UK’s departure from the bloc, coupled with successive Tory Governments’ attempts to woo Donald Trump, have left London less important to Washington, former senior officials have claimed.

While Mr Trump’s focus on Nato spending and his spat with Brussels on trade saw him engage more with Britain, Mr Biden, who takes the office of president on January 20, is a completely different kettle of fish.

Even before his election victory he warned Mr Johnson against taking actions around Brexit that might harm security in Northern Ireland.

Charles Kupchan, who advised the National Security Council on European affairs under Bill Clinton and Barak Obama, painted a difficult picture of post-Brexit relations for Britain.

He told Politico:  ‘When you wanted to get something done with Europe, you made the first or perhaps second call to London. [In 2021, you’re still going to call London, but that call will be lower down in the queue. 

‘Britain doesn’t have a seat at the table anymore.’  

Lewis Lukens, who was a US deputy ambassador to the UK under Obama and Trump, added: ‘I’d say the best case scenario for a deal is 2022.’

While Mr Trump’s focus on Nato spending and his spat with Brussels on trade saw him engage more with Britain, Mr Biden, who takes the office of president on January 20, is a completely different kettle of fish

The UK’s departure from the bloc, coupled with the current Tory Government’s attempts to woo Donald Trump, have left London less important to Washington, former senior officials have claimed

Despite Mr Trump’s ongoing efforts to call into question the legitimacy of Mr Biden’s win, he his set to leave the White House in less than three week’s time

Trade talks have yet to resume after being halted in October by the US presidential election. 

Mr Biden is set to make Anthony Blinken his secretary of state – the US’s top diplomat.

In 2019 he described Brexit as a ‘total mess’ in a podcast interview, adding: ‘This is not just the dog that caught the car, this is the dog that caught the car and the car goes into reverse and runs over the dog.’ 

Despite Mr Trump’s ongoing efforts to call into question the legitimacy of Mr Biden’s win, he his set to leave the White House in less than three week’s time.

However there have been some signs that a limited deal could be struck by then.

Before Christmas the US trade chief has said that the outgoing administration is negotiating with the UK to secure a mini-deal reducing trade tariffs before Biden takes power.

Robert Lighthizer suggested tariffs on single malt Scotch whisky could be reduced if a post-Brexit pact is successful. 

Talks on an interim deal emerged after the UK dropped tariffs against the States over subsidies for aerospace firms.

Britain said on Thursday its decision to suspend retaliatory tariffs against the United States was already bearing fruit after it was spared in a new round of US tariff increases which hit French and German produce.

Britain said earlier this month it would use its new-found freedom outside the European Union to diverge from common EU trade policy towards the United States, deciding to unilaterally suspend tariffs relating to a 16-year dispute on aircraft subsidies.

The US government on Wednesday said it would raise tariffs on certain EU products, including aircraft components and wines from France and Germany, arguing that the EU had unfairly calculated its own tariffs.

‘The UK wasn’t hit because we suspended tariffs and brought the U.S. to the negotiating table,’ a British official said. ‘(This) shows we are making the right strategic decisions.’

The United States and EU have already imposed tariffs on billions of dollars of each others’ goods over a row about state subsidies provided to civil aviation firms Boeing and Airbus. Those tariffs remain in place. 

The British decision to suspend tariffs on US goods from January 1, once Britain fully leaves the EU, upset European planemaker Airbus and exposed a growing rift between the UK and Europe over aerospace investment, industry sources and analysts said.

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