Afghanistan veteran blasts Boris Johnson and Joe Biden: ‘I feel betrayed’

Taliban says Joe Biden will 'provoke a reaction' if US troops stay

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US President Biden signalled that he wanted evacuations from Kabul airport completed by the end of the month as he prepares to withdraw all American troops. The move is likely to force Britain to finish its operations at the same time, though Mr Johnson will reportedly plead to extend a deadline for US troops leaving the country. The Prime Minister will use an emergency G7 summit on Tuesday to appeal to Mr Biden to extend his August 31 withdrawal deadline to resolve the mayhem at Kabul airport.

Seven people died in the crush there this weekend, taking the airport’s total death toll to 20.

The chaotic withdrawal has seen Mr Biden suggest he could be willing to bow to demands for an extension and revealed discussions were already under way.

The Taliban warned there would be “consequences” if the US delayed their withdrawal. 

British army veteran Trevor Coult told Mr Farage on his GB News programme that Mr Johnson and Mr Biden had “betrayed” him, and called the leaders “idiots” for their decision to withdraw from Afghanistan. 

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Mr Coult said: “I feel betrayed by Boris Johnson, I feel betrayed by the President of the United States. 

“I think both leaders are complete idiots. 

“They have left the people of Afghanistan to fend for themselves.” 

Mr Coult, who has been involved in over 100 military engagements, also commented on Britain’s decision to deploy 800 troops to Afghanistan to help evacuate nationals.

He said: “There’s no air support, it’s a complete mess.

“Let’s be honest we couldn’t beat the Taliban when we had the Green Berets, the SAS, the paratroop regiment – with the best firepower we had –  and we’ve now sent over a battalion of men without any of those assets.

“I think they’re vulnerable and I hope they get back in one piece.”

Mr Coult is a recipient of the Military Cross who served in the British Army for 20 years, including on four tours of Afghanistan.

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The Taliban declared victory eight days ago after Afghan President Ashraf Ghani fled the country, which brought to an end almost 20 years of a US-led coalition presence in Afghanistan. 

Their offensive began months ago, but accelerated in recent weeks as the army gained control of a number of new territories before ultimately taking the nation’s capital Kabul. 

Most British troops left Afghanistan in October 2014, though around 750 people remained to train the country’s military.

Yet in July Mr Johnson announced that “British troops assigned to NATO’s mission in Afghanistan are now returning home”.

The Prime Minister has been heavily criticised for the withdrawal by contingents of his own party. 

Conservative MPs described the UK and the West’s withdrawal from Afghanistan as “ignominious”, “catastrophic”, and “humiliating” on Wednesday’s recall of Parliament. 

Moreover, Tory MP Tom Tugendhat, who served in Afghanistan, spoke of attending the funerals of fallen comrades in a moving speech to the Commons. 

Mr Biden too has received backlash for his decision to withdraw, with former Prime Minister Tony Blair branding him “an imbecile” on Sky News over his “unnecessary” decision to leave Afghanistan. 

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